Cit:Pel.etal:2017

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Author Pel, Leo; Pishkari, Raheleh
Year 2017
Title Wick action in cultural heritage
Bibtex @inproceedings {Pel.etal:2017,

title = {Wick action in cultural heritage}, booktitle = {Proceedings of SWBSS 2017. Fourth International Conference on Salt Weathering of Buildings and Stone Sculptures, University of Applied Sciences Potsdam, Germany, 20-22 September 2017}, year = {2017}, editor = {Laue, Steffen}, pages = {33-38}, month = {september}, organization = {Fachhochschule Potsdam}, publisher = {Verlag der Fachhochschule Potsdam}, note = {fulltext, conference paper}, key = {SWBSS2017}, doi = {10.5165/hawk-hhg/318}, author = {Pel, Leo; Pishkari, Raheleh} }

DOI 10.5165/hawk-hhg/318
Link File:SWBSS 2017 Proceedings 33-38 Pel Pishkariie.pdf
Notes in: Proceedings of SWBSS 2017 - Fourth International Conference on Salt Weathering of Buildings and Stone Sculptures. University of Applied Sciences, Potsdam, Germany, 20-22 September 2017



Bibliography

[Pel.etal:2017]Pel, Leo; Pishkari, Raheleh (2017): Wick action in cultural heritage. In: Laue, Steffen (eds.): Proceedings of SWBSS 2017. Fourth International Conference on Salt Weathering of Buildings and Stone Sculptures, University of Applied Sciences Potsdam, Germany, 20-22 September 2017,Verlag der Fachhochschule Potsdam 33-38, 10.5165/hawk-hhg/318Link to Google ScholarFulltext link

Abstract

Salts crystallization is one of the main degradation mechanisms of historical objects, e. g., masonry. In this study we looked at a special case often encountered in marine environment, i.e., wick action. This is a steady state situation in which one end of an object is continuously absorbing a salt solution, e. g., sea water, whereas at the same time at other side there is continuous drying. As a result there will be a continuous flux of ions towards the drying surface and the concentration at the drying surface will slowly increase, resulting eventually in crystallization. In this study we looked at wick action for a 1 m NaCl solution using a biomicritic limestone from Sardinia, which is found in many cultural heritage objects. To measure both moisture and salt content simultaneously, we have used a specially designed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) set-up. The wick action experiment was performed for over 40 days. The results show that the concentration over 40 days slowly increases at the top until the saturation concentration is reached. It is shown that the concentration profiles can be modelled by a simple analytic solution of the advection-diffusion equation describing the ion transport. Keywords: Wick action,