Cit:Charalambous.etal:2017

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Author Charalambous, Cleopatra; Ioannou, Ioannis
Year 2017
Title Efficiency of laboratory produced water repellent treatments on limestone
Bibtex @inproceedings {Charalambous.etal:2017,

title = {Efficiency of laboratory produced water repellent treatments on limestone}, booktitle = {Proceedings of SWBSS 2017. Fourth International Conference on Salt Weathering of Buildings and Stone Sculptures, University of Applied Sciences Potsdam, Germany, 20-22 September 2017}, year = {2017}, editor = {Laue, Steffen}, pages = {110-117}, month = {september}, organization = {Fachhochschule Potsdam}, publisher = {Verlag der Fachhochschule Potsdam}, note = {fulltext, conference paper}, key = {SWBSS2017}, doi = {10.5165/hawk-hhg/327}, author = {Charalambous, Cleopatra; Ioannou, Ioannis} }

DOI 10.5165/hawk-hhg/327
Link File:SWBSS 2017 Proceedings 110-117 Charalambous Ioannou.pdf
Notes in: Proceedings of SWBSS 2017 - Fourth International Conference on Salt Weathering of Buildings and Stone Sculptures. University of Applied Sciences, Potsdam, Germany, 20-22 September 2017



Bibliography

[Charalambous.etal:2017]Charalambous, Cleopatra; Ioannou, Ioannis (2017): Efficiency of laboratory produced water repellent treatments on limestone. In: Laue, Steffen (eds.): Proceedings of SWBSS 2017. Fourth International Conference on Salt Weathering of Buildings and Stone Sculptures, University of Applied Sciences Potsdam, Germany, 20-22 September 2017,Verlag der Fachhochschule Potsdam 110-117, 10.5165/hawk-hhg/327Link to Google ScholarFulltext link

Abstract

A number of cultural and architectural heritage structures all over the world are built with natural stone. Although this material is considered to be one of the most durable geomaterials, many existing stone buildings and monuments show clear evidence of decay and weathering. The deterioration of stone is strongly related to the presence and movement of water within its pore network. Therefore, hydrophobic surface treatments are usually adopted to protect existing or new stonework. Such treatments, however, should not affect the breathability of stone; else, there is a risk of enhancing possible decay mechanisms, such as salt crystallization. Natural limestones appear to have a degree of inherent water repellency. This has been confirmed through multiple measurements of capillary absorption at different temperatures, using water and organic liquids. The measurements were carried out on several building and decorative limestones, showing in each case an anomalously low water sorptivity. This natural water repellency of limestones was attributed to the presence of organic contaminants, such as fatty acids, in the pore network of the materials under investigation. In this paper, the natural water repellency of Cypriot limestones is exploited to develop several water repellent surface treatments, based on oleic acid. The aforementioned laboratory produced treatments were applied on a Cypriot calcarenite with proven poor durability characteristics. The results suggest that all treatments can permanently reduce the wettability of the stone under investigation, without modifying its composition or appearance. In order to investigate the durability of the treated stone, wetting/drying cycles were performed. The results provide strong evidence that treatment with oleic acid positively affects the durability of the stone under study. Consequently, the aforementioned surface treatment may be potentially used in practice to protect stone facades in buildings and cultural heritage sites.